CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS IN THE USE OF PERSONALITY TESTS IN CLINICAL ASSESSMENT
 
Cheung, F.M., The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
 
Clinical psychologists in Asian countries frequently use translated versions of Western personality tests in clinical assessment. While there are many advantages in using translated tests, psychologists should be aware of the cross-cultural equivalence and relevance of these tests. In this address, I will discuss the methodological considerations in adapting Western tests, review the cross-cultural validity of some of the major tests in Asia, and identify the deficiencies in these tests. I will introduce an indigenous personality test that has been developed in Asia, the Chinese Personality Assessment Inventory (CPAI), and discuss its theoretical and methodological significance. The CPAI clinical scales demonstrate convergent validity with other translated scales. The cultural relevance of the indigenous scales on the CPAI illustrates the need to fill the gap in cross-cultural assessment. The combined emic-etic approach in the development and validation of the CPAI may be used a model for the development of indigenous assessment measures.