MEASURING MANUAL LATERALITY IN CHILDREN WITH THE BISHOP'S REACHING CARD TEST. A DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY
 
Carlier, M., Audrey, P. and Lise, D.A., PsyCLE, Universit de Provence, France
 
Bishop's reaching card test is supposed to combine features of both preference and performance in manual laterality (Bishop et al., Brit. J. Psychol., 1996, 87, 269-285). The participants is asked to pick up a card named by a figure and put it in a box situated at the midline. The hand used is recorded (7 positions, 6 cards each position). In a validation study undertaken with adult French participants we have explored the metric qualities of this test and determined to what extent it contributed to findings from other tests used in laterality studies (Doyen & Carlier, Laterality, 2002, 7, 115-130). The test showed good metric qualities. However the constitution of subgroups of laterality as a function of manual preference (measured by the 12 items of Annett's Handedness Inventory) was not validated. Following our investigations we turn to child populations. In a first step the reaching card test was adapted for non-reader children using drawings of animals easy to identify instead of figures. In a second step, samples from nursery and elementary schools were assessed with the age adapted form of the reaching card test plus Annett's peg moving test and Handedness Inventory. Groups of hand preference according to Bishop and Annett tests were compared and correlations between laterality indexes will be presented. The developmental changes observed across ages in the reaching card test will be discussed using the mechanism underlying functional asymmetries as a framework.