DOES OR DOESN'T INTER-GROUP COMPETITIVENESS MAKE ORGANIZATION MEMBERS TOLERANT OF FELLOW WORKERS WITH LOW CONTRIBUTION?
 
Ura, M. and Isobe, C., Hiroshima University, Japan
 
Previous research suggests that inter-group competitiveness increases in- group favorableness, and such favorableness has a dual direction. One is the motivation to enhance one's own group as a whole, while another is the motivation to be tolerant of other members. In highly competitive situations, organization members may feel conflict to or not to accept a fellow worker who cannot contribute sufficiently to their organization. In order to explore which motivation becomes salient in such a situation, a questionnaire survey was conducted. One hundred and thirty eight Japanese company employees completed a questionnaire which consisted of the following: (1) a collective self-esteem (CSE) scale, which measures strength of employees' social identity on their company, (2) a scale to measure the level of perceived competitiveness between their company and a rival company, and (3) a scale for their attitudes (rejecting and accepting) toward a fellow worker with high or low contribution to the company. Two(high or low CSE)2(high or low competitiveness) 2(high or low contribution of the fellow worker) ANCOVAs (employees' organizational commitment was included as a covariate) were conducted. The interaction between the fellow worker's contribution and the competitiveness between companies was significant. Under a low competitive situation, employees rejected the fellow worker with low contribution more strongly than one with high contribution, while under a highly competitive situation, employees' tendency to reject their fellow worker was low, regardless of the fellow workers' contribution level.