ABSTRACT AND PRAGMATIC BELIEFS ABOUT EDUCATION, ACHIEVEMENT GOALS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES OF FILIPINO COLLEGE STUDENTS
 
Bernardo, A.B.I., De La Salle University-Manila, Philippines
 
Research among ethnic minority students in North America suggest that abstract and pragmatic beliefs about the function of education is a factor that might explain the different levels of achievement among the ethnic groups. The present study looks into how abstract and pragmatic beliefs about education are related to achievement goals (mastery, performance, avoidance, & conformity) and learning strategies (rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, metacognitive strategies) of students. College students in the Southern Philippines answered questionnaires about their beliefs about the function of education, in particular about (a) the abstract value of education, (b) the pragmatic value of high school education, (c) the pragmatic value of college education, and (d) the pragmatic value of achieving in formal education. The students also answered questionnaires about their achievement goals and learning strategies. The results of the analysis indicated: (1) high endorsement of the abstract value of education, but low endorsement of the pragmatic values of education, (2) significant correlations among the different pragmatic values, but no correlation between the abstract and pragmatic values, (3) the abstract and pragmatic values correlated only with the performance goal orientation and with the low level learning strategy of rehearsal, and (4) only the pragmatic value of achieving in formal education was correlated with the higher level learning strategies. The results are discussed in terms of how students' perceived pragmatic value for education constraints the achievement goals, motivations, and learning strategies adopted by the students.