A LONGITUDINAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A THREE-DAY 'MANAGEMENT OF VIOLENCE' TRAINING PROGRAM FOR STUDENT NURSES
 
Beech, B., Keele University, and Leather, P., University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
 
Health care staffs are known to be at risk of high levels of exposure to workplace violence and aggression. Student nurses are particularly vulnerable. Not surprisingly, therefore, there has been a huge growth in the provision of training interventions designed to equip student nurses with the knowledge, skills and ability to handle workplace violence. However to date there has been little rigorous evaluation of such training. In this paper, the results of a longitudinal evaluation of one particular three day training program are presented. Based on a multi-domain evaluation model, data was collected from three student cohorts using a self-completion questionnaire constructed to measure a range of outcomes including declarative knowledge; conceptual models; attitudes and beliefs; confidence in self and one's own skills; and attributions of blame. Data was collected at four time points: twice prior to the training, immediately at the end of training, and three months following training. A series of repeated measures t-tests are used to analyse the data. Results demonstrate a consistent and robust positive effect of training.