INCIDENCE, SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH VIOLENCE AGAINST LATINO WOMEN AND CHILDREN
 
Frojn Parga, M.X. and Zarza Gonzlez, M.J., Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Spain
 
This study, based on a psychological learning perspective, pursues the incidence and risk factors in domestic and family violence in 46 heterosexual women who completed several confidential questionnaires to include the CTS (Straus, 1979). The present study focuses on the prevalence of domestic and family violence within the Latino Spanish-speaking female community in the state of New Jersey. It also studies the factors (social, demographic, familiar and educational, psychological and attitudinal) related to the existence of domestic and family abuse. The incidence within this community is underestimated, as it is in other cultures, since victims of domestic violence are reluctant to report the abuse for fear of safety, economical issues, embarrassment, feelings of guilt, fidelity, attachment to the aggressor (Dutton & Painter, 1981), among many other factors. Results show a high prevalence of violence against women and children and significant associations between a male perpetrator's history of family violence and the violence they commit against their partner and children. In addition, results reveal an association between low education, instability in the previous family and attitudes toward violence and fear in relation to severity of violence in the family. The conclusion includes the existence of a relationship between different types of violence within the family unit and within the entire community.