GENDER DIFFERENCES AND JOB STRESS IN RELATION TO SOCIAL CLASS
 
Fotinatos, R., Deree College, The American University of Greece, Greece
 
Research on gender differences and occupational stress has been the theme of numerous articles and literature to date. However, little attention has been paid to the combined effects of gender differences and job stress, in relation to ones socioeconomic status. This study, therefore, reports the findings of occupational stress amongst 2,500 men and women, representing all social classes. Data were collected Via a questionnaire on a random sample within the UK. Univariate analysis of the results showed that the gender distribution of the sample is comparable to the national average on a number of important variables. In addition, females reported significantly poorer physical and mental health than men, despite the fact that women reported using more coping strategies than men. Multiple regression analysis was performed on the total sample and on subgroups, to examine which stressor variables predict lesser well being amongst men and women in different social classes, and which variables predict greater job satisfaction amongst the sexes.