CORE SELF-EVALUATIONS AND THE DISPOSITIONAL CORE OF JOB SATISFACTION: EVIDENCE FOR A CLOSE RELATION
 
Dormann, C. and Zapf, D., Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt and Fay, D. and Frese, M., Justus Liebig-University Giessen, Germany
 
Previous research and theorizing raised doubts about the usefulness of job satisfaction as a tool for work and organizational assessment because personality dispositions have been supposed to be strongly related to job satisfaction. Using 2 waves of a 4-wave 4-year longitudinal study of job stayers, a state-trait decomposition of job satisfaction was applied. It showed that the effect of changing situational factors on job satisfaction is more than 3 times higher than the effect of stable sources, which was only about 20%. Second, when this stable factor was regressed on core self- evaluations, it turned out that control cognitions, which are akin to locus of control, and negative affectivity explained almost all of its variance. It is concluded that core self-evaluations provide a very good explanation for the stable dispositional core of job satisfaction. The influence of dispositional influences, however, do not contradict a high amount of malleability in job satisfaction because dispositional are only indirect via selection or self-selection to working conditions.