THE EFFECT OF PERCEIVED INTER-GROUP COMPETITIVENESS AND GROUP IDENTITY ON THE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT
 
Isobe, C. and Ura, M., Hiroshima University, Japan
 
What factors influence an individuals' organizational commitment? According to the social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), the more group members perceive inter-group competitiveness and have group identity, the more they should feel organizational commitment. However, Lewin (1941) argued that individuals would leave their group, when the balance of two powers became minus. One of the two powers is the power to make them stay in the group and the other is the power to make them leave the group. Therefore, if inter-group competitiveness as an external demand doesn't correspond to the level of group identity as an internal demand, individuals would feel low organizational commitment. In order to examine this prediction, we investigated 134 company employees. We asked them questions relating to perceived inter-group competitiveness (how much you or your members feel hostility to another company), group identity to their company, organizational commitment to their company, amongst others. A result of ANCOVA on the organizational commitment score revealed the main effect of group identity and two-way interaction. In the situation of high inter-group competitiveness, individuals high in group identity felt high organizational commitment. Alternatively, in the situation of high inter- group competitiveness, individuals low in group identity felt low organizational commitment. These results suggest that perceiving high inter- group competitiveness does not necessarily promote organizational commitment, but the effect of perceived inter-group competitiveness on organizational commitment depends on the level of individuals' group identity.