PSYCHOLOGICAL SCALE OF JUSTICE FOR CRIMINAL CASES: A COMPARISON BETWEEN LAY PERSONS' JUDGMENT AND ACTUAL COURT DECISIONS
 
Ida, M. and Yatabe, Y., Tokiwa University, Japan
 
Court decisions in criminal cases are sometimes different from what a lay person thinks is appropriate as punishment for the offenders. In this study, university students were asked to judge what they thought were appropriate sentences for the accused in 20 real criminal cases. There is a linear function between the students' subjective judgments and actual sentences handed down by the courts. The students' judgments were more severe than those of the courts in all instances, by an average of 3.6 years. Difference scale and ratio scale were obtained for the lay persons' assessment of the crimes and their punishment. There is the same relation between the two scales as in other psychophysical measurements. This leads to the possibility of measuring people's subjective values in justice.