INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN A GOAL-SETTING SITUATION: AN EXAMINATION OF THE MOTIVATIONAL TRAIT QUESTIONNAIRE
 
Hinsz, V.B. and Jundt, D.K., North Dakota State University, USA
 
We examined the reliability and utility of the sub-scales of the Motivational Trait Questionnaire (MTQ) in a goal-setting situation involving task performance. The MTQ measures individual differences in motivation to perform and has 3 underlying factors, each comprised of 2 related sub-scales: Personal Mastery (Desire to Learn and Mastery), Competitive Excellence (Other Referenced Goals and Competitiveness), and Motivation Related to Anxiety (Worry and Emotionality). We compared our sub-scale reliability ratings with those of Kanfer and Ackerman (2000). We also examined these sub-scales in relation to a task performance situation. We hypothesized that higher levels of desire to learn, mastery, other referenced goals, and competitiveness would lead to higher levels of self- set goals, task performance, goal commitment, self efficacy, and goal mediating mechanisms, while higher levels of worry and emotionality would lead to lower levels of these constructs. Our reliability analyses yielded results that were virtually identical Kanfer and Ackerman's (2000). Our hypotheses regarding the relationship between performance and desire to learn, mastery, competitiveness, other referenced goals, and emotionality were all supported. We also found that self-efficacy was related to levels of desire to learn, mastery, other referenced goals, competitiveness, and emotionality. Furthermore, we found that goal commitment and goal mediating mechanisms were correlated with desire to learn and mastery. Based on our findings, we believe that the MTQ is a reliable way of measuring the components of motivation, especially in goal setting and task performance situations.