EFFECTS OF SELF-INVESTIGATIVE JOB CONTENTS INFORMATION (SJCI) FOR NEWCOMERS' JOB SEARCH AND DECISION: EXPLORATORY SURVEY IN JOB SEARCH PROCESS IN JAPAN
 
Hashimoto, M. and Matsue, S., Nanzan University, Japan
 
In Japan, it is common that newcomer's job search process is followed in order: collecting information of companies, analysis of industries, attending explanatory meeting of each company, submitting vitae, taking selection tests and interviews, getting informal assurances of employment (nai-tei, in Japanese). During job search process, applicants must investigate job contents information all by themselves, so that the information is gathered by themselves, called "self-investigative job contents information" (SJCI) in Japan. SJCI's effects on the following success of selection and socialization after entry as is believed in Japan, however, were not yet empirically substantiated. The purpose of this study was (1) to confirm factor structure of SJCI, and (2) to examine how SJCI sub-dimensions affect job attitudes as results of employees' organizational socialization. Questionnaires were sent to employees of Japanese companies and 104 returned. Results yielded that SJCI consisted of two factors as hypothesized: "evaluation of oneself" (EO), and "evaluation of industry, company, and vocation" (EICV). Pearson's correlation coefficients among these two SJCI sub-dimensions, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment showed only EICV significantly correlated job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Hierarchical regression analyses were executed to evaluate the magnitude of SJCI's sub-dimensions on job attitudes, and results yielded that greater impact of EICV on job satisfaction and organizational commitment was detected among female respondents. Implications for future research were discussed, especially about the impact of proactive investigation during selection process on organizational socialization.