THE ETIOLOGICAL PROCESS OF OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AND COPING: A TRI-NATION ANALYSIS (AUSTRALIA, SINGAPORE & SRI LANKA)
 
Goh, Y.W., University of Queensland, Australia
 
The transactional perspective has been a widely accepted theoretical principle that underpins many current occupational stress and coping researches. The most prevalent transactional model currently being used to explain the etiological process of occupational stress and coping was that of Lazarus and Folkman's phenomenological theory (1984). However there is insufficient research effort to examine the model's cross-cultural reliability in today's multinational organisations. The present research investigates the transactional process of occupational stress and coping in Australia, Singapore and Sri Lankan. Using full-time employees as subjects, this study provides evidence to show that the transactional model is present in all three nations but it is not sufficient as a model to fully represent the process of occupational stress and coping within specific country. Each nation has its unique etiological features in addition to the basic transactional process as theorized by Lazarus and Folkman (1984). This research shows that the etiological process of occupational stress and coping is multi-dimensional in nature with universal and country specific attributes. The findings have implications for future cross-cultural research in related fields as well as future stress management programs.