EMOTION WORK AND WELL-BEING IN SERVICE OCCUPATIONS: THE ROLE OF EMPLOYEE'S AFFECT-RELATED ABILITIES AND WORKPLACE CHARACTERISTICS
 
Giardini, A. and Frese, M., University of Giessen, Germany
 
For many service occupations the expression of positive emotions is part of the work task. For this type of job demand the term 'emotion work' has been coined. While the display of positive emotions is advantageous with regard to customer evaluations, for the employee such emotion work can bring along problems. For example, in the service context research has repeatedly found a negative relationship between emotional dissonance, a facet of emotion work that describes the discrepancy between felt and displayed affect, and psychological well-being. The question arises if the occurrence as well as the negative impact of emotional dissonance can be reduced by factors that lie in the individual or in the work environment. This study investigated the potential influence of some of these factors. On the person side we focused on abilities that concern the processing and regulation of affect. As work environment variables we examined the social support of colleagues and supervisors. In a cross-sectional study with 121 sales clerks we collected data from self-reports as well as peer-reports. Results show that abilities and environmental variables are directly related to the employee's perception of emotional dissonance, job satisfaction and well- being. Moreover, some of the variables moderated the relationship between emotional dissonance and well-being.