DIFFERENCES IN ORGANIZATIONS AND JOB OUTCOMES AS CORRELATES OF ATTRIBUTIONS
 
Krishna, A., Vasanta College for Women, India
 
A study was conducted on a sample of technical and non-technical (N= 300) employees chosen from two public (N=150) and two private sector (N=150) industrial organizations in which employees self-appraised their performance while attributing different (success/failure) job outcomes to six causal categories (ability, effort, luck, supervision, nature of work and company policies). Results showed public and private sector employees differed in their attribution patterns. Private sector employees had higher mean attributions to internal factors (ability, effort) whereas public sector employees were high on attributions to external factors (luck, supervision, nature of work and company policies). Sector differences were more sharp with respect to the use of six causal categories in attributions to success/ failure job outcomes. Private sector employees attributed more to ability, effort in success condition whereas public sector employees attributed more to nature of work, luck, supervision and company policies in failure condition. These findings have important implications for predicting employees' subsequent performance in achievement context and for developing various training programmes in which attribution change is an integral part of the training.