PREDICTION OF LOCUS OF CONTROL FROM SELF-EVALUATION OF BEHAVIOR (IN HOME, SCHOOL AND WITH PEER) AND SOME FAMILY BACKGROUND IN IRAN
 
Khayyer, M., Shiraz University, Iran
 
The study is based on social information processing model of Crick and Dodge (1994). The study addressed three questions: First, the contribution of some familial and self-evaluation of behavior (in home, school and with peer) variables in predicting locus of control; second, the contribution of some familial variables in predicting self-evaluation of behavior; third, the direct and indirect effects of each familial variable on both self- evaluation of behavior and locus of control. The instruments for measuring self-evaluation of behavior and LOC were Brown's and Hamill's (1978) Behavior Rating Scale and Nowicki and Strickland (1973) respectively. Children were drown randomly from eight primary and junior high-schools. In total the sample size consisted of 712 students, 9 to 14 years old (399 girls and 313 boys). The results showed that all of the independent variables, except parent's education, father's occupation and self- evaluation of behavior in relation to peer group, made a significant contribution in predicting LOC. The best predictor of LOC was self- evaluation of behavior in school and then self-evaluation of behavior in home situation, divorce or death of parent and family size, in that order. Father's occupation, family size and mother's education, in that order made significant contribution to predicting self-evaluation of behavior in home situation is explained by the independent variables. Mother's education and family size, in that order, made significant contribution to predicting self-evaluation of behavior in school situation. Father's occupation and mother's education, in that order made significant contribution to predicting self-evaluation of behavior with peers. Parent's education, father's occupation, and self-evaluation of behavior with peer group have indirect effects on locus of control through their significant correlation with the other independent variables. Causation was not necessarily implied, because the nine variables in the model might have shared their variance with other variables not included in the present study.