A STUDY OF TAIWANESE COLLEGE STUDENTS' WELL-BEING: THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG DEPRESSION, STRESS, SOCIAL SUPPORT, SELF-ESTEEM, AND SELF-RATED HEALTH STATUS
 
Kao, Y.T., I-Shou University, Taiwan
 
The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of depression on college students' well-being by testing impacts of stress, social support, self-esteem, and self-rated health status. OF 348 students invited to participate in this cross-sectional study, 343 students successfully completed self-administered questionnaires. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was chosen to measure the symptoms of depression. Among these participants, aged from 18 to 30, 147 were females and 196 were male students. Multiple regression, correlation and ANOVA were utilized to analyze the collected data. The results revealed that significant correlations existed among depression and four chosen variables. Furthermore, multiple regression process indicated that stress and social support were significant predictors for the magnitude of depression. With high stress and low social support, the likelihood of depression magnitude increased. In addition, different supports played a significant role in depression phenomena. Moreover, compared with the group having low depression scores, those with higher depression scores tended to have low self-rated health status, low self-esteem and were less likely to conduct health behaviors. However, there was no significant difference between male and female students regarding depression level, a result that contrasted to previous research. Explanations are provided and future research directions are discussed.