GOOD ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENS VS. GOOD SOCIAL CITIZENS: THE IMPACT OF MOTIVES AND ANONYMITY ON WHISTLEBLOWING INTENTIONS
 
Kamdar, D., Chia, H.B. and Nosworthy, G., National University of Singapore, Chay, Y.W., Singapore Management University, Singapore
 
Researchers have generally regarded organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) as desirable among employees. This study examined the role of organizational directed OCB and motives (loyalty boosterism, organizational commitment, and motives of organizational concern) and co-worker directed OCB and motives (interpersonal helping, individual initiative and motives of pro-social values) on the intention to report company wrongdoings anonymously vs. non-anonymously. One hundred and two oil refinery employees from a Fortune 500 company located in North India completed a questionnaire measuring the predictor variables and responded to a series of vignettes that contained the between-subjects experimental manipulation. The vignettes described various examples of company wrongdoing and specified either legal guarantees of whistleblower anonymity or no such guarantees. In general, individuals were more likely to whistle blow when anonymous. However, we also found highly significant interactions between anonymity and OCB as well as anonymity and motives in predicting willingness to engage in whistle blowing (WB). In general, organization-directed sentiments and WB intent were negatively correlated in the non-anonymous condition while uncorrelated in the anonymous condition; however, coworker- directed sentiments and WB intent were negatively correlated in the anonymous condition while uncorrelated in the non-anonymous condition. These results demonstrate the importance of person-situation interaction in whistle blowing research. The findings are interpreted in terms of individual's level of affect (toward organization vs. co-workers) and target of self-presentation (organization vs. co-workers).