THE VALIDITY OF THE INTEGRATED PROCESS MODEL OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT FOR JAPANESE WOMEN
 
Kakuyama, T., Tokyo International University, Japan and Onglatco, M.L., University of the Philippines, Philippines
 
We investigated the applicability of the integrated process model of the antecedents and consequences of sexual harassment in organizations (Hulin, Fitzgerald, & Drasgow, 1996) in the Japanese cultural context. Organizational climate for sexual harassment was assessed with the Organizational Tolerance of Sexual Harassment Inventory (Hulin, Fitzgerald, & Drasgow, 1996), and the frequency of experiences of sexual harassment was assessed with the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire (SEQ; Gelfand, Fitzgerald, & Drasgow, 1996) for 161 Japanese working women. Organizational climate was positively related to sexual harassment, thereby indicating that sexual harassment was likely to have more often occurred in organizations wherein there were greater perceptions of tolerance of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment had more potent negative influence on physical strain for women with high victim vulnerability (i.e., women who were lower in age and education, and unmarried) than for women with low vulnerability. Sexual harassment also had more salient negative influence on psychological strain for low self-esteem women than for high self-esteem women. Against the predictions of the model, sexual harassment was related neither to gender job context nor to job satisfaction. It was concluded that the integrated process model partially explains the process of sexual harassment for Japanese working women.