EFFECT OF JAPANESE SUBJECT ON CORRESPONDENCE BIAS
 
Kakuno, M. and Ura, M., Hiroshima University, Japan
 
On occasions, the subject of a Japanese sentence is omitted. Such an expression makes the subject of behavior ambiguous, and causes personal cognition to confuse the situation. This study examined the correspondence bias in the Japanese language. Participants read an essay supporting the introduction of a graduation examination system. The essay "with subject condition" included Japanese subjects, that is, "I" in almost all of the sentences. In contrast, the essay "without subject condition" did not include "I" at all. Participants were told that the target person was assigned to write an essay supporting the introduction issue, regardless of their true attitude toward it. Furthermore, participants in the "accuracy condition" were asked to read the essay as carefully as possible. While in the "control condition" the participants were asked to read the essay normally, without care for accuracy. After reading the essay, participants were asked to infer the true attitude of the target person toward the introduction of a graduation examination system. A 2(subject) X 2(accuracy) analysis of variance was carried out for inferred attitude. There was a significant interaction effect of subject and accuracy: Participants who read an essay with sentence subject and read it without care for accuracy inferred a more positive attitude of the target person than those who read the essay without sentence subject or read it accurately.