EFFECT OF MODERNIZATION ON SUPERSTITION, RELIGIOSITY AND MENTAL HEALTH OF INDIAN TRIBAL WOMEN
 
Joshi, R., Life Coping Skills, India
 
Modernization of society during the last century has influenced the social and behavioural patterns of women globally. Tribal cultures are at the threshold of being influenced by the changing social and technological order in India. Jaunsari Tribe, who represent one of the famous polyandrous and polygynandrous Himalayan tribes, are known for their strong belief in spirits, demons and supernatural powers and cultural rigidity. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the influence of modernization on superstition, religiosity and mental health profile in three generations (daughters, mothers and grandmothers) of Jaunsari tribe women. Modernization Scale (R.S. Singh, A.N. Tripathi and Ramji Lal), Superstition Scale (L.N. Dubey and B.M. Dixit), Religiosity Scale (L.I. Bhushan) and PGI Health Questionnaire (N.N. Wig and S.K. Verma) were administered to 453 women equally divided into three generations. The findings suggested that all the three generations differed significantly on modernization, superstition, religiosity and mental health. Daughters were observed to be more modernized and consequently scored low on superstition, religiosity and Neuroticism Score (Mental Health) compared to mothers and grandmothers. No significant differences were, however, encountered on Social Desirability Scores (L-Score) amongst the three generations. High- modernized women group scored significantly lower on Superstition, religiosity and Neuroticism score in comparison to the Low -modernized group. Modernization correlated negatively with superstition and religiosity. These finding would be discussed in relation to the known traditional rigidity of this tribal society to the changing social and technological orders in the world.