HOW DO MOTHERS AND FATHERS ELICIT CHILDREN'S TALK ON THE PAST EVENT?
 
Jin, J.A., Chiba University, China and Naka, M., Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
 
Based on the tape-recorded mother-child and father-child talk on the past event, we intersectionally examined (1) how mothers and fathers change their way of eliciting children's talk according to their children's age, and (2) whether or not there is difference in talk with their children between mothers and fathers. The participants were 3- to 5 year-old Chinese children (N= ) and their mothers and fathers. The main findings are (1) The amount of speech on the part of parents decreased over children's age; (2) The parents of younger children used more wh-questions, yes-no questions, and repetitions; (3) The parents of 3 and 4 year-olds asked for more information on the same topic and questions for clarification than parents of 5 year-olds. (4) In overall, fathers, especially those of 4 year-olds, spoke more than mothers, used more yes-no questions and repetitions and questions for clarification. From these results, we concluded the parents of 3 year-olds provided much more scaffoldings to elicit their children's talk than those of 4 and 5 year- olds, and fathers support children's talk in a different style than their spouses.