THE ROLE OF SELF-REGULATORY COGNITIONS IN CHANGE OF SEAT BELT USE
 
Luszczynska, A., Warsaw University, Poland
 
Most adolescents and young adults are reluctant to use seat belt regularly due to motivational or self-regulatory deficits. The Health Action Process Approach (Schwarzer, 1992, 2001), a health behavior change model that proposes the separation of motivation and action phases, such as goal setting and goal pursuit, was applied to data from 358 students. Risk perceptions, outcome expectancies, self-efficacy specific for motivation phase, and intention to use seat belt were assessed at Wave 1. Half a year later, planning and self-efficacy specific for action phase (i.e., maintenance and recovery) were assessed. Seat belt use was measured at Wave 1 as well as at Wave 2. Of the participants, only 6% declare regular use of their seat belts. Results of path analysis with latent variables reveal that all constructs included in motivation phase of HAPA model (i.e., risk perception, outcome expectancies, and preaction self-efficacy) predict the intention of seat belt use. Planning appears to be the best predictor of seat belt use, followed by phase-specific self-efficacy. The results show the influential role of self-regulatory strategies, especially phase- specific self-efficacy and planning. The study supports the assumption that Health Action Process Approach may be used as heuristic for further research on health behavior change.