HYBRID METHODOLOGY IN THE STUDY OF GUIDANCE CURRICULUM FOR HONG KONG SCHOOLS
 
Luk-Fong, Y.Y., The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
 
This paper reports the development of a hybrid methodology for the study of guidance curriculum in Hong Kong schools. Hong Kong has been known as a place where East meets West. Official educational documents since the handover of Hong Kong to China in 1997 consistently highlight this particular context of Hong Kong. As guidance is essentially from the West, debates about the suitability of using Western methodology and concepts for non-Western societies abound in the literature. This paper argues for the development of a hybrid methodology for the study of guidance curriculum in Hong Kong. A qualitative case study method is applied which uses open-ended questions for understanding the "self" in guidance but incorporates Confucian cardinal human relationships of parent-child, brother-sister, husband-wife, friend-friend/teacher-pupil and superior-subordinate in understanding the "other" relationships. These questions are combined with Lawton's model of curriculum development (1973) in the Western traditions. Data obtained from stakeholders in schools include traditional Chinese ideas as well as modern Western ideas in "self-other relationships". The adequacy and contribution of this hybrid methodology is explored. Implications of this framework to the study of other societies with a mix of Western and indigenous cultures are discussed.