MENTAL HEALTH STATUS OF GRADUATE STUDENTS FROM ABROAD IN GRADUATE SCHOOL COMMUNITY IN JAPAN: EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS USING CES-D AND GHQ-12
 
Lin, S.M., Osaka University, Japan
 
Students from foreign countries to Japanese universities and graduate schools may generally have faced a number of stressful events pertaining to their study, research, living expenses, relationship among family members, friendship, etc. As an increasing number of such students come and stay at Japanese universities and graduate schools, the need to recognize their mental health status, including the sources of their stress responses, has come to be an urgent matter in view of "graduate school community." This present article investigated mental health status of graduate students from foreign countries at one of the oldest Graduate Schools of Engineering in Japan, using depression (CES-D) and neurotic tendency (GHQ-12) scales to examine their adaptation level to the graduate school, and further investigation to identify the impact of antecedents (e.g., general adaptation to graduate school, human relations with advisory professor, Japanese language skills, social supports from family and human networks). A questionnaire was distributed to each of the students and 128 completed ones were returned. Results showed that approximately 50 percent of respondents were diagnosed as depressive, and 95 percent yielded neurotic tendency, and that Japanese language skills as distal antecedent significantly affected general adaptation to graduate school and human relations with advisory professor as proximal one, which totally influenced the respondents' mental health status. Implications for future research and action plans were discussed, especially in terms of community intervention programs to prevent graduate students' mental illness.