PREDICTORS OF ENJOYMENT AND ANXIETY: THE ROLE OF PERCEIVED MOTIVATIONAL CLIMATE, DISPOSITIONAL GOAL ORIENTATIONS AND PERCEIVED COMPETENCE
 
Lim, Y.P. and Wang, J., National Institute of Education, Singapore
 
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of individual's perceived motivational climate, goal orientations and perceived competence on enjoyment and anxiety. 145 female netball players who participated in a local netball competition took part in the study. They were aged between 12 - 16 years (M = 14.30, SD = .80) and represented their respective schools. They completed questionnaires assessing perceived motivational climate (PMCSQ-2; Newton, Duda & Yin, 2000), dispositional goal orientations (POSQ; Roberts, Treasure & Balague, 1998), intrinsic motivation (perceived competence, enjoyment and effort subscales of IMI; McAuley, Duncan & Tammen, 1989) and somatic and cognitive anxiety (SCAT; Martens, 1977). Results of the multiple regression showed that perceived motivational climate, goal orientation and perceived competence emerged as significant predictors of enjoyment. Specifically, athletes with high perception of mastery climate, high task orientation and high perceived competence tend to experience greater enjoyment. In terms of anxiety, ego orientation positively predicted somatic anxiety while perceived competence negatively predicted somatic anxiety. On the other hand, perceptions of competence also negatively predicted cognitive anxiety. This study showed that in order to promote enjoyment in sport, it is important to create a mastery- oriented learning environment which emphasize on task mastery and self- improvement, the mastery experiences may, in turns, increase the perception of competence of the athletes and lead to reduced competitive anxiety.