AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF TWO TRAINING STRATEGIES FOR YOUNG DRIVERS - EFFECTS ON ASSESSED AND ACTUAL DRIVING ABILITY
 
Nyberg, A. and Nolen, S., Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Sweden
 
During the 1990s there was a gradual shift in driver training in Sweden from a "skill oriented" content, towards a "insight oriented" content. In the present study two test groups had undergone a day of driver training with either a "skill oriented" or "insight oriented" content. A control group had not undergone any special training at all. The participants were subjected to three tests some weeks after the training. Here, only the test concerning any tendencies for the drivers to overestimate their own driving ability would be presented. The subjects were exposed to two different "critical situations" on a slippery section of a driving range. The task was first of all to judge in how many of five possible tries they thought that they would manage to perform the driving task without error. They then had to perform the driving task five times. The difference between judged and real driving performance is used as a measure of the overestimation, if any, of driving ability. In the exercise relating to braking and evasive action, the Skill Group had a significantly higher assessment than the Control Group. In the exercise "straight braking" the difference between the Skill Group and the Insight Group is significant. No significant difference in actual driving performance could be demonstrated between any of the groups. In both exercises a tendency was found that the Skill Group overestimated their driving ability to a greater degree than the other groups.