DELIBERATIVE THINKING FOR JOB-HUNTING AND SELF-EVALUATION PROCESSES IN JAPANESE UNDERGRADUATES. WHEN AND WHO EVALUATES ONESELF ACCURATELY?
 
Nishimura, T. and Ura M., Hiroshima University, Japan
 
This study investigated the relationship between the deliberative thinking for job-hunting and the self-assessment motivation in Japanese undergraduates. For undergraduates, it is an important matter to consider their future image of themselves, in particular, finding employment after graduation. Furthermore, their future lives would be affected by different kinds of occupation or types of job. Thus, they would be often required to judge realistically based on their own abilities and aptitudes for the job. If so, when and who evaluates oneself accurately regarding job-hunting? Shepperd et al. (1996) revealed that college seniors became less optimistic about estimation of their likely salary after graduation as graduation drew nearer, but not juniors or sophomores. Therefore, the difference of grade would influence their self-assessment motivation. In addition, we should point out that some traits of individual difference, particularly self- esteem, influence the self-assessment motivation. In general, those with low self-esteem tend to seek accurate information about self and the situation around self, but they are likely to not be able to get information and judge themselves in accordance with the situation. We conducted a questionnaire survey to clarify the relationship mentioned above. Results show that those with high self-esteem elicit their self- assessment motivation as the grade increases, but this pattern was not found in those with low self-esteem. These results suggest that both situational factors and individual differences influence the self- assessment motivation when considering job-hunting.