THE INFLUENCE OF PARTICIPANTS' PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH AND A PRESENTED EXAMPLE ON THE PRODUCTION OF EMOTION WORDS
 
Ogawa, M., Keio University, Hatano, G., University of the Air and Sugawara, I., Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Japan
 
The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) how readily Japanese undergraduates would produce positive and negative emotion words, and (2) whether generated words would vary according to their psychological health and a presented example. Japanese female students participated (n=88). Theywere asked to write 20 emotion words in about five minutes, a half of them being presented with "glad" (positive condition) and the other half, "sad" (negative condition) as an example. They were also asked to reply a questionnaire assessing psychological health (constructed by T. Tardif), and divided into the above-mean and below-mean groups.Following Shaver et al.(1987), we judged whether generated words were an emotion word, and if so, classified them into "positive", "negative" or "neutral/undecided". The average number of words generated by each student was 12.7, including 2.4 "positive" words and 6.2 "negative" words. Almost all students produced the emotion words "sad", "glad" and "enjoyable", unless the word had been given as an example, but generally had difficulty recalling other emotion words, especially positive ones. A health (2) by example (2) ANOVA revealed that the positive group, compared with the negative group, produced significantly a lower proportion of "positive" words and a higher proportion of "negative" words. This unexpected result would be due to the highly limited retrievability of positive words. The psychological health showed no significant effect, revealing that even relatively healthy students produced more negative words than positive words