SELF, GENDER, AND NATIONAL IDENTITY IN A POST-COLONIAL STATE: INDONESIAN CASE
 
Malik, A., New School for Social Research, USA
 
History of colonialism shows the seemingly universal process of "othering" - naming, dichotomizing, and stigmatizing - the natives. Everywhere we go, and Indonesia is not an exception, we find the natives being described as lazy, childlike or immature, cunning, filthy, coward, unpredictable, indolent, untrustworthy, dishonest, inept, promiscuous, immoral, and the like. For women, in addition to being described negatively as native, they also carry extra burden of being described negatively as "woman". This paper attempts to show that, despite the past fifty years of indoctrination and propaganda to instill a positive image of the "new" Indonesian, the colonial images of the native are still salient in the mind of Indonesian. Specifically, it attempts to explore the relation between self, gender, and national identities in contemporary Indonesia. Results of an empirical study with Indonesian college students will be presented. Policy implications related to nation building and gender discrimination eradication will be put forward.