THE EFFECT OF DISCREPANCY AMONG DESIRED SELF, ACTUAL SELF AND REFLECTED SELF FOR MENTAL HEALTH
 
Maeda, K., Hasegawa K. and Ura M., Hiroshima University, Japan
 
Individuals have self-concepts about themselves. For example, the Actual Self is a self-image that an individual believes that he or she has about themselves (e.g., "I am kind."). The Desired Self is a self-image that an individual would like to be (e.g., "I want to be kind."). The Reflected Self is a self-image that an individual believes is how others think about him or her (e.g., "I believe that others think I am kind."). The Desired self is very positive, and people attempt to bring their Actual Self close to the Desired Self. But when people recognize these types of self they have discrepancies, people feel negative affects. The major purpose of our study is to investigate the effect of self-discrepancies. Previous studies have suggested that these effects might be moderated by the self-guide and the relationship with the other as a source of reflected self-appraisal. Therefore we investigated these factors as moderators. To verify these predictions, the study researched using the undergraduate students. Participants completed scales for the Actual Self, the Reflected Self and the Desired Self, self-discrepancy, fulfillment, depression, anxiety and mental health. Results show that the Desired-Actual Self-discrepancy decreased fulfillment and increased depression, but interactions of Desired- Actual Self-discrepancy and self-guide were not significant. Conversely, significant interaction effects of the Desired-Reflected Self-discrepancy and relationships were found, for fulfillment, depression and anxiety. The relationship moderated the impact of self-discrepancy for mental health.