JOB TRANSITIONS, ORGANIZATIONAL CAREER MANGEMENT AND CAREER SATISFACTION: DOES RESPONSIBILITY MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
 
Raabe, B., Siemens Qualification & Training and Frese, M., University of Giessen, Germany
 
Today many well-established corporations face the necessity to teach their employees more self-responsibility and employability. They can enhance their future employability by practicing career management and being proactive. Hall and Mirvis (1996) argued that the balance between shared responsibility for career management by both the organization and the individual has shifted to solely the individual. Although career management is widely postulated as an employees' responsibility, organizations encompass in a number of activities that foster career development and help to retain employees. Sturges, Guest, & McKenzie Davey (2000) found organizational career management to predict organizational commitment. A large German corporation started in the mid-nineties to develop training to help employees take over more responsibility for their own self-development and to ensure their own employability. This study investigated employee attitudes, perceived organizational career management practices, different job transitions, salary growth, and career satisfaction of employees who participated in a career development training. The sample consisted of 100 employees, 13 women and 87 men, of a large technology company in Germany. The mean age of the participants was 35 years, the mean job tenure was 2.6 years and the mean organizational tenure was 6.6 years. Employees' career satisfaction was predicted by income increases due to intraorganizational movement, experienced organizational career management, and an attitude of responsibility to manage one's own career. This attitude was also strongly linked to proactive personality and employability perceptions.