THE RELATION BETWEEN THE EXTENT OF WORRY AND THE POSITIVE PREDICTION TOWARD WORRY
 
Teng, M.H. and Weng, C.Y., National Chung-Cheng University Taiwan
 
Worry is an intriguing phenomenon whose nature has only recently come under experimental scrutiny. Worry in GAD (and other anxiety disorder) is defined as pathological worry. Pathological worry is a chain of thoughts and images, negatively affect-laden and relatively uncontrollable; it represents an attempt to engage in mental problem solving on an issue whose outcome is uncertain but contains the possibility of one or more negative outcomes. (Borkovec, 1983: Davey, 1994;Dugas , 1997 ) Borkovec (1994) and Wells (1995, 1998) found that patient with pathological worry have some positive predictions to the outcome of worry, such as "I use worry as a strategy of problem solving." In addition, Borkovec also found GAD patient have more positive predictions than college students. However, we still don't know the importance of this positive prediction in normal worry and the role between extent of worry and positive prediction. In this study, we try to investigate the relation between positive predictions and the extent of worry. We interfere there is a positive correlation between worry and positive prediction toward worry. We used three self-report scales to measure the extent of worry (by using PSWQ, WDQ) and the positive prediction (By using Positive Belief Scale; PBS) in 100 normal subjects. At last, the correlation between the extent of worry and positive prediction are positive and significant (r=0.433-0.462). Our finding will have some contributions in clarifying the role and importance of positive predictions in the process of worry.