EFFECTS OF RELEVANT AFFECT ON INFORMATION PROCESSING OF ADVERTISING MESSAGES
 
Tanaka, T., Hitotsubashi University, Japan
 
Regarding the role of mood sates on information processing, participants' mood states have been manipulated independently from the message contents (irrelevant affect). In the previous research, negative mood lead to more systematic processing than positive mood. But when the mood would stem from the message itself (relevant affect), the participants in positive moods would be motivated to maintain their mood states, and continue to process the message which made them feel happy, whereas the participants in negative moods would be motivated to regulate their moods, and avoid processing the message which made them feel sad. In this study, the relevant affect (positive or negative) were induced to participants through the ad materials and the extent of the elaboration for the ad messages were measured. The argument quality of the messages (strong or weak) were also manipulated. It was predicted that the differences of the attitude to the argument quality would be greater with the participants in positive moods than those in negative moods. The participants' memory for the ad messages and the neutral picture next to them were also measured by unexpected recall test. Although the result did not show the expected pattern on the attitude measures, in the strong argument condition, the participants in positive moods recalled more arguments of the messages and less contents of the picture than those in negative moods. The future directions for the implication of the effective ad materials will be discussed.