RESPONSIBILITY ATTRIBUTIONS TO VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: A STUDY OF HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONAL TRAINEES IN HONG KONG
 
Tam, S. Y. and Tang, S. K., The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
 
A total of 225 Chinese human service professional trainees (80 police trainees, 45 medical students, and 100 nursing students) participated in a study on responsibility attribution to violence against women (VAW). Results showed that female gender-typed professional trainees (nursing students) had the most liberal attitudes toward woman and the broadest definitions of VAW, followed by gender-balanced professional trainees (medical students), and male gender-typed professional trainees (police trainees) held the most traditional views toward women and the most restrictive definitions of VAW. Among the three trainee groups, nursing students perceived VAW as the most frequent events and having the most serious negative effects on the victims and the community, police trainees perceived VAW as having the least negative effects on the victims, and medical students perceived VAW as the least common events and having the least negative effects on the community. Furthermore, medical students attributed the highest level of responsibility to the perpetrators, whereas there was no group difference in the attribution of responsibility to the victims. Among the predictor variables for responsibility attribution to the perpetrators, the most salient predictors were type of professional trainees, attitudes toward women, and perceived effects on the victims. There was no significant predictor for responsibility attribution to the victims. Limitations and implications of the study were also discussed.