ORGANIZATIONAL IDENTITY, COMMITMENT, AND JOB SATISFACTION: THE ROLE OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS, PERCEIVED ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT, AND SELF- EFFICACY
 
Sue-Chan, C., University of Manitoba, Canada
 
This research investigated whether organizational characteristics influence employees' identification with and commitment to the organization as well as their job satisfaction. The moderating roles of perceived organizational support and self-efficacy on the relationship between organizational characteristics on one hand and organizational identification, commitment, and job satisfaction on the other was also investigated. Organizational characteristics were operationalized as employee-oriented and rule-oriented culture. Survey data were collected from employees (n = 775) representing all occupational groupings in a Canadian hospital. Structural equation modeling indicated that a model in which perceived organizational support is a mediator of the employee- oriented culture - job satisfaction relationship and a moderator of the employee-oriented-culture - organizational commitment relationship provided an adequate fit to the data (chi-sq = 1.98, ns; RMSEA = .04, CFI = .96). The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.