THE MAIN EFFECT OF COACHING ORIENTATION AND MODERATING EFFECT OF IMPLICIT CONCEPTS OF ABILITY ON PROBLEM-SOLVING
 
Sue-Chan, C., University of Manitoba, Canada and Wood, R.E., University of New South Wales, Australia
 
This research investigated the effect of coaching orientation on the cognitive assessments, affective reactions, and behavioural intentions in two studies. In the second study, these effects were investigated in addition to the impact of coaching orientation on problem-solving performance. Moreover, the moderating influence of implicit concept of ability was also investigated in study 2. Data were collected from 165 and 122 Canadian management students studies 1and 2, respectively. Participants were randomly assigned to either an approach (focus on improving) or avoidance coaching (focus on avoiding making mistakes) condition in both studies. The first study presented the coaching orientation manipulation as a scenario and the second as a direct demonstration of coaching. In the second study, participants were also randomly assigned to either an incremental concept of ability or entity concept of ability priming condition. It was hypothesised that approach coaching would lead to higher cognitive assessments (perceived expertise of the coach; perceived trustworthiness of the coach), affective reactions, behavioural intentions, and problem-solving performance than avoidance coaching. Implicit concept of ability (incremental versus entity) was also hypothesised to moderate the relation of coaching orientation and these outcomes. The analyses fully supported the main effect hypotheses across the two studies and partially supported the moderating hypotheses in study 2. More specifically, implicit concept of ability was found to moderate the relation of coaching orientation on one hand and perceived expertise of the coach and behavioural intentions on the other.