FAILURE TO COMPREHEND: LIMITED METACOGNITIVE KNOWLEDGE OR FAILURE TO USE METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES?
 
Wong, M.Y., Chang, S. and Lee, K., Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
 
This study examined good and poor readers' metacognition and their use of metacognitive strategies in two comprehension tasks. In addition, we examined the efficacy of metacognitive intervention designed to improve reading comprehension at secondary level. Two inventories, measuring metacognition and use of metacognitive strategies, were administered to a sample of 150 Singaporean secondary one students in the express and normal academic courses. The participants rated their reading awareness and knowledge of metacognitive strategies in one inventory. The other inventory administered determined the students' strategic engagement and provided details about the kinds of metacognitive and cognitive strategies employed in the reading text passages. The findings raise questions about the significance of metacognitive processes demonstrated in normal reading by native speakers of the English language. Although there is clear evidence that comprehension can be facilitated by enhancing readers' awareness of metacognition and by encouraging them to monitor and control their reading, it appears that there are limits to how much metacognitive processes influence the local students' reading comprehension abilities.