DYSFUNCTIONAL LEADERSHIP, BULLYING IN THE WORKPLACE, AND BURNOUT OF WORKERS
 
Steensma, H. and van de Veerdonk, R., Leiden University, The Netherlands
 
Violence in the workplace is a troubling issue facing workers. Violence can take several forms. Also, a distinction should be made between external violence caused by organizational outsiders, and internal violence or bullying (i.e., violence committed by colleagues and/or superiors). Former research has shown that bullying can be explained by several factors: job characteristics, in particular lack of job control combined with high job demands; group dynamics; characteristics of victims and perpetrators. The present study focuses on leadership behavior and on procedural, interactional, and distributive injustice. Former victims of burnout (N = 69) filled out questionnaires. Failure behavior of leaders and obstructive leadership styles covaried with frequency of bullying. Also, perceived violations of procedural, interactional, and distributive justice norms covaried with bullying. Many employees working under leaders with failure behaviors seem to suffer from the cynicism (or depersonalization) component of burnout. Implications of the results for the design and implementation of anti-bullying policy in organizations are discussed.