THE EFFECT OF THE ATTITUDES SHOWN BY THE RESPONDENT IN SELF-DISCLOSURE ON IMPLICIT AND EXPLICIT SELF-ESTEEM OF THE DISCLOSER: INVESTIGATION OF THE SENSITIVE MEASURE FOR CLINICAL COUNSELING
 
Shiomura, K., Shinshu University, Japan
 
Forty university students participated in this experiment. The participants were asked to disclose themselves to the respondent who is a confederate of this experiment. The attitude of the respondent was experimentally manipulated as two conditions, the one is acceptable condition and the other is non-acceptable condition. We measured implicit self-esteem by GNAT (the Go/No-go Association Task: Nosek & Banaji, in press) and explicit self- esteem by two personality scales. The GNAT is a conceptually similar technique to other implicit measures like the Implicit Association Test (IAT: Greenwald et al., 1998). Moreover, the GNAT can be used to examine implicit association toward a single target category. The implicit associations of SELF with GOOD, SELF with BAD, OTHER with GOOD, and OTHER with BAD are implicit self-esteem indexes measured by GNAT. Rosenberg self- esteem scale and acceptance of self and others scale developed by E. M. Berger are explicit self-esteem indexes. We analyzed the degree of change in these indexes before and after the self-disclosure. The results in implicit indexes and explicit indexes are different. The results in implicit indexes suggested that the boundary between self and other was made unclear by self-disclosure. In discussion, we focused on the clinical application and the investigation of the relationship between implicit and explicit self-esteem.