CURRICULUM VITAE

 

(a)        PERSONAL

 

            Full Name:                    Michael Cosby Knowles

 

            Address:                       33 Spring Road, Malvern, 3144

 

            Place of Birth:               Longreach, Queensland

 

            Contact Number:          Home:              (613) 9824 7752

                                                Work:              (613) 9903 1810

                                                Fax:                  (613) 9903 1168

                                                E-mail:              mike.knowles@buseco.monash.edu.au

 

 

(b)        QUALIFICATIONS

 

              University of Edinburgh                                   Ph D, 1968

 

              University of Queensland                                M Com, 1965

                                                                                    B Com (Hon), 1961

                                                                                    President, University College

                                                                                    President, Psychology Students'                   Association

                                                                                    University Rugby XV

                                                                                    Queensland Rugby XV

 

            Queensland Agricultural College, Gatton           QDAH, 1956

 

            Scholarships received                                       Commonwealth Scholarship

                                                                                    Queensland State Scholarship

 

(c)        APPOINTMENTS

 

            Current appointment

 

            Monash University,                                           Head of Organisational Behaviour,

            Faculty of Business and Economics                   MBA Program, 2000+

                                                                       

 

            Visiting appointments

 

            Wharton School of Management,                      Visiting Scholar, 1979

            University of Pennsylvania

 

            Sloan School of Management,                           Visiting Scholar, 1975

            Massachusetts Institute of Technology              

              

            Previous Appointments

 

            Monash Mt Eliza Business School                     Head of Organisational Behaviour,

                                                                                    MBA Program, 1997-1999

 

            Monash University,                                           Director, MBA Programs 1994-1996

            Faculty of Business and Economics                   Coordinator, General MBA 1990-1993

                                                                                    Lecturer, Senior Lecturer 1970-1989

 

            University of Edinburgh                         Lecturer, 1966-69

 

            Commonwealth Department of              Senior Personnel Practice Offr., 1964-65

            Employment, Education and      Training            Industrial Psychologist, 1962-64

 

At the completion of my first degree I was disinclined to enrol in a higher degree immediately as I had found neither an area that really appealed to me nor a topic in which I was interested. In Australia at the time, organisational behaviour as a field of inquiry was non-existent. So my first job after graduation was in the Personnel Practice Section of a Commonwealth Government department which undertook research and advisory work in the personnel area. Not only was this experience invaluable but also it gave me the material to enrol for a Masters degree which I completed part-time.  Another immense benefit was that staff had the opportunity to publish the results of their research. In this way I was lucky to have one of my articles reviewed in a British journal by an academic at the University of Edinburgh. This led in due course to my being appointed on a short-term contract at that University, and this position was converted to a tenured lectureship one year later. At the same time I enrolled for a Ph.D. which I completed in three years.

 

Not long after receiving the Ph.D. I was contacted by Monash University which had just launched its MBA and wanted someone to lecture in the field of Organisational Studies. Although the four years in Scotland were wonderful, and what I learnt as a Faculty member at the University indescribably beneficial, I decided to return to Australia and contribute what knowledge and skills I had acquired to this bold initiative of Monash University in launching only the second MBA in the country. The timing was perfect for I had the privilege of lecturing to the first cohort of students in the final year of their program and thus to each cohort of students who have joined the MBA ever since. Along the way I have been involved with most major decisions concerning the development of the program, and in due course I was appointed to the position of MBA Director. During this time the program grew not only to become the largest and top ranked MBA program in Australia but also the largest graduate program of any University in the nation.

 

Paradoxically, the success of the MBA in one way became its undoing in another. By this I mean that the program was the first in the University to be privatised, in so far that the MBA had to operate totally independently of the University from a financial point of view. This was achieved simultaneously by combining the MBA Division with the Australian Management College to form the Monash Mt Eliza Business School, a merger which lasted five years until the University under new leadership wanted to reclaim the MBA as its own. Owing to my identification with the MBA I was seconded from the University to the Business School for this five year period, returning to the University at the beginning of last year when the MBA did also where we are now both happily re-ensconced in our former surroundings.

 

Of all the things that I have been involved with in the development of this innovative and dynamic program, the one that I wish to emphasise is the international orientation of the degree. This is illustrated in two principal ways. One, is the student body which comprises approximately 30 per cent of international students. This is over twice the average for the University as a whole. The other is the extent to which I have had the opportunity to lecture, attend conferences and recruit students overseas, mainly in the Asia region. In this way my international experience has broadened over time to include most countries in the broad triangle linking India, Japan and Indonesia.

 

                                                           

(d)               INTERNATIONAL AWARD

 

Largely for my involvement with the International Association of Applied Psychology and the International Union of Psychological Science, both of which will be describe more fully later, but also on account of my work in the Asian region as just described, in 1998 I was presented with the inaugural Annual Award of the American Psychological Association for ‘distinguished contributions to global psychology’.

 

                                                           

(e)        RESEARCH

 

On account of the overwhelmingly important role which research plays in academic life I have always been actively involved in research and have published regularly.  These activities fall into three categories.

 

The first of these revolved around my Ph.D. and led to seven publications in refereed journals.  To some extent, however, this thesis formed the start of what turned out to be a decade of continuous research culminating in the publication of the monograph Organizational Functioning: a Behavioural Analysis.  This is one of the few research monographs by an Australian author to be published overseas, and has been reprinted twice.

 

The second major line of research inquiry was developed around the principal subject in which I teach, and again what amounted to an unbroken decade of research led to the publication of Organizational Behaviour: Changing Concepts and Applications.  To undertake this task was a major decision for I realised it would take me out of mainstream research until the manuscript was completed. At the time I was the third most cited author in our Faculty but what overrode this consideration was the fact that the kind of organisational behaviour that I was teaching was essentially North American and European in structure and content, by virtue of the textbooks prescribed for the subject. Given this, practically no real allowance was being made for the local cultural context in which this knowledge and its associated techniques were to be applied. So the intent of the book was to take the best of international theory and practice, and draw upon local research and case studies whenever possible. Without going into detail unnecessarily, suffice it to say that the initial aim was to complete the book in two and a half years. In the actual event, it took three times this long. Then I understood why so local few academics write textbooks from scratch, preferring to make adaptations of successful overseas publications although, not withstanding the above, this remains a practice that I cannot condone.

 

Currently, I am involved in a third line of research dealing with planned organisational change.  It is common experience that many change programs run into difficulty because of a lack of recognition and awareness of organisational culture.  Thus, the present research is concerned with developing ways and means of identifying organisational culture so that a model of planned change consistent with the prevailing organisational culture can be chosen.

 

The refereed articles arising out of these three main areas of activity have been published in a variety of journals. The most prestigious of these are the International Journal of Psychology, the principal publication of the International Union of Psychological Science; Applied Psychology: an International Review, the flagship publication of the International Association of Applied Psychology; and Human Relations, the primary journal concerned with the integration of the Social Sciences.  My most recent top level publication was in Executive Excellence.

 

In addition, seen in its broadest sense, there have been two other areas of research activity. One of these has involved my Ph.D. supervision in which I have encouraged students to follow lines of inquiry which are highly original.  Perhaps the most innovative of these was a study in which the student attended in the role of an observer all meetings over a two and a half year period of a prominent Archbishop with his Bishops and senior managers. This research was concerned with identifying how change within institutions is influenced by the values and beliefs held by its leaders, in this case, its senior clergy and administrators.

 

In the second of these additional areas of activity, by virtue of my commitment to scientific and professional associations which will be described later, I have also published a sizeable number of non-referred articles, all of which have been written for national and international audiences.  These reflect my heavy involvement at a senior level in recent years in the governance of these international associations.

 

Publications

 

1999.  Competitive teams.  Executive Excellence, 16, 10, 19 (invited article).

 

1998.  Regional Congress of Psychology for Professionals in the Americas.  International Journal of Psychology, 33, 5, 363-366.

 

1998. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 10,1,4-6.

 

1997. Increasing organizational effectiveness through organizational analysis. Australian Psychologist,  32, 3, 1-5 (invited article).

 

1997. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 9,2,4-14.

 

1997. Managerial competencies: an international review. Proceedings of the Regional Congress of Psychology for Professionals in the Americas, Mexico City, 310-314 (invited address).

 

1997. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 9,1,3-6.

 

1996. Analysing and managing organizational values.  Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Work Values and Behavior, Montréal, 487-496.

 

1996. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 8,2,3-6.

 

1996. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 8,1,4-7.

 

1995. Conceptualizations of work, family and leisure by managers of information technology.  In H.S.R. Kao, D. Sinha and S.H. Ng (Eds.) Effective Organizations and Social Values.  London: Sage Publications (reprinted).

 

1995. Secretary-General's Report.  Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 7,2,3-4.

 

1995. Secretary-General's Report. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 7,2,3-4.

 

1995. Secretary-General's Report. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 7,1, 6-9.

 

1994. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 6,2,2.

 

1994. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 6,1,2-3.

 

1993. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 5,2.2.

 

1993. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 5.1.2.

 

1992. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 4,2,2-4.

 

1992. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Associated on Applied Psychology, 4, 1, 2.

 

1991. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 3, 2,6.

 

1991. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 3,1,2.

 

1990. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 2,2,2-4.

 

1990. Visiting Kyoto. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 2, 1, 6-10.

 

1990. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 2, 1, 2.

 

1990. Conceptualizations of work, family and leisure for managers of information technology.  International Journal of Psychology, 25, 735-750.

 

*1990. Organizational Behaviour:  Changing Concepts and Applications.  Sydney:  Harper and Row.

 

1989. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 1, 1, 2-3.

 

1989. The International Association of Applied Psychology and its 1990 Congress in Kyoto.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 11, 3, 96-97.

 

1989. Editorial. Newsletter of the International Association of Applied Psychology, 1, 2, 2-3.

 

1988. An investment in education.  Australian Director, July/August, 40.

 

1988. 21st International Congress of Applied Psychology.  Applied Psychology: an International Review, 37, 1, 85-93.

 

1988. The International Association of Applied Psychology and the 1988 Congress.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 10, 3, 118.

 

1987. Impressions from 21st International Congress of Applied Psychology, Jerusalem, 1986.  Man and Work, 1,1, 48-57.

 

1987. Organizational behaviour : trends and issues in Australia.  Journal of Social and Economic Studies, 4,4 283-296.

 

1987. Trends and issues in organizational psychology.  Proceedings 22nd Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, Canberra.

 

1986. International Association of Applied Psychology: objectives, structure and current activities.  Proceedings 21st Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society, Townsville.

 

1986. Viable and dysfunctional organizational units.  Proceedings 21st International Congress of Applied Psychology, Jerusalem.

 

1985. Re‑structuring Council:  time for a different approach.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 7, 2, 24‑27.

 

1985. The International Association of Applied Psychology and the 1986 Congress in Jerusalem.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 7, 3, 22 & 31.

 

1985. IAAP 1986 Congress in Jerusalem.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 7, 5, 44.

 

1984. 1988 International Congress President.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 6, 2, 1,.

 

1983. Models for restructuring Council.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 5,2,1‑3.

 

1983. Academic interests of members of the Executive Committee of the International Union of Psychological Science.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 5,4,3‑4.

 

1983. National Director: role and responsibilities.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 5,5,3‑7.

 

1982. Presidential address: so this is psychology.  Australian Psychologist, 17, 221‑237 (invited paper).

 

1982. Re‑structuring Council.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 4, 5, 3‑4.

 

1982. In retrospect.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 4,4,1‑2.

 

1982. The 1981 Conference of the Chinese Psychological Society.  Australian Psychologist, 17, 119‑127.

 

1982. The Chinese Psychological Society.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 4,1,3.

 

1982. Turbulence:  adaptation and accommodation.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 4,2, 1‑2, 1982.

 

1982. Production and satisfaction vis‑a‑vis performance and morale.  Proceedings 20th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Edinburgh.

 

1982. Meeting change with challenge.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 4,3,4.

 

1982. Zuzhi guanli xinlixue di fazhan.  Waiguo xinlixuejia baogao ji (Developments in organizational psychology.  Psychology Bulletin, Chinese Psychological Society), 41‑46. (invited paper). 

 

1981. Council:  function and structure.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 3,6,1.

 

1981. Developments in organizational psychology.  Proceedings Chinese Psychological Society Conference, Peking (invited address).

 

1981. Unity and diversity.  Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 3,5,4.

 

1981. Labour turnover: aspects of its significance.  Reprinted in W.M. Ainsworth and Q.F. Willis (eds.) Australian Organizational Behaviour:  Readings.  Melbourne: Macmillan.

 

*1980. Organizational Functioning: a Behavioural Analysis.  Farnborough:  Gower Press.

 

1979. Job satisfaction and the organization's internal structure.  Australian Journal of Management, 4, 69‑78, (with A.D. Knowles).

 

1979. Organizationally induced absenteeism.  Journal of Industrial Relations, 21, 351‑357.

 

1978. An empirical analysis of organizational culture.  Proceedings 19th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Munich.

 

1978. Factors affecting job satisfaction of supervisors.  Journal of Industrial Relations, 20, 138‑145, (with A.D. Knowles).

 

1976. Labour turnover:  aspects of its significance.  Journal of Industrial Relations, 18, 67‑76.

 

1975. A case study in organization development.  Australian Psychological Society 9th Annual Conference, Perth.  Abstract: Australian Psychologist, 10, 114.

 

1975. Furthering insights into the management of people.  In D. Gunzberg (ed.) Bringing Work to Life:  the Australian Experience.  Melbourne:  Cheshire, in association with the Productivity Promotion Council of Australia.

 

1975. Interdependence among organizational variables.  Human Relations, 28, 431‑450.

 

1974. Organization development in Australia:  some psychological contributions.  Australian Psychological Society 8th Annual Conference, Sydney.  Abstract: Australian Psychologist, 9, 98‑99, (with P. Ivanoff & J.P. O'Connor).

 

 1974. Industrial relations in Australia: an organizational perspective.  Journal of Industrial Relations, 16, 21‑28.

 

1973. Psychological and sociological aspects in industrial relations.  In Industrial Relations in the Transport Industry, The Chartered Institute of Transport, Melbourne.

 

1972. The nature of industrial accidents.  Journal of Industrial Relations, 14, 125‑131.

 

1972. The criterion question in systems theory.  Australian Psychological Society 7th Annual Conference, Canberra.  Abstract: Australian Psychologist, 7, 258.

 

1967. Changing management practices in an industrial organization.  Proceedings European Foundation for Management Development Conference, Edinburgh.

 

1965. A longitudinal study of labour turnover.  Personnel Practice Bulletin, 21, 6‑17.

 

1965. The impact of management decisions on labour turnover.  Personnel Practice Bulletin, 21, 42‑48.

 

1965. Person‑person interactions in the man‑machine system.  Proceedings 1st Annual Conference, Australian Ergonomic Society, Melbourne.

 

1964. A review of labour turnover research.  Personnel Practice Bulletin, 20, 25‑37.

 

1964. Labour turnover ‑ costing and cost.  The Australian Accountant, 34, 385‑389.

 

1964. Personnel and job factors affecting labour turnover.  Personnel Practice Bulletin, 20, 13‑18.

 

1963. Group assessment in staff selection.  Personnel Practice Bulletin, 19, 6‑16.

 

 

(f)        TEACHING

 

Just as research acts as a stimulus for teaching, so too does teaching act as a powerful motivation for learning, and in all my teaching I have aimed to make the learning experience for students one of the most memorable aspects of their degree.

 

In keeping with this commitment to enthusiasm in learning, I have always been dedicated to innovation in teaching, both in content and method.  For example, both the two main subjects in which I teach were the first of their kind to be introduced into Australian University syllabuses.  In other words, the Monash MBA was the first program in Australia, either graduate or undergraduate, in which Organisational Behaviour was taught, and the same applies also to Human Resource Management.  In other words I was able to bring innovations to applied psychology in general and management education in particular which reflected the latest international advances in these areas.

 

In similar vein, I was the first person in Australia to use process analysis as a way of understanding small group behaviour and to employ this method in a teaching context to facilitate experiential learning. Such an innovation was one of the immediate outcomes of my first sabbatical leave taken with the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts of Technology. Thus I was able to connect applied psychology and management education in Australia not only with the Lewinian group dynamic movement in North America but also its European antecedents. As indicated in the Attachments, these innovative approaches to teaching and learning have consistently been welcomed by students who rate the major subjects in which I teach as among the most highly valued in their programs.

 

Apart from wanting to keep applied psychology in general and management education in particular abreast of the latest developments in international theory and practice, I have also wanted to make local students aware of the contributions of Australian psychologists to the global body of knowledge uniting us all.  In this regard, two people stand out in particular, namely Elton Mayo who joined Harvard University in the USA and Fred Emery who worked at the Tavistock Institute of Human Relations in Britain.  In other words, rather than introducing students to a body of knowledge that is remote and abstract, my aim has been to demonstrate that they are just as much in touch with the field as any other students in the world.

 

In addition, as alluded to before, over the past decade I have had an increasing number of opportunities to lecture in Asia.  This has been mostly in countries with developing economies and thus ones very much in need of benefiting from international theory, methodology and technique.  In this respect my most recent visit was last year when I was invited to Vietnam to lecture on the Overseas Volunteer Program organised through the auspices of the National University of Vietnam in Hanoi.  In every case of lecturing overseas, just as I have done in Australia, I have tried not only to connect students with current global thinking but also, in so far as I am able, to relate the latter to their own history, language and culture.

 

 

(g)        PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

 

Given the professional as well as the scholarly and scientific orientation of the field in which I teach and research, it has been of the utmost importance to become actively involved in professional associations. This I did firstly with the Australian Psychological Society and next with the International Union of Psychological Science.  Currently it is with the International Association of Applied Psychology.

 

In the Australia Psychological Society I served initially as its Treasurer and later as its President.

 

In connection with the International Union of Psychological Science, in 1980 I was elected onto the International Congress Committee which was responsible for planning and hosting the 24th International Congress of Psychology in Sydney.  This attracted over 3,500 registrations and is one the largest scientific meetings ever convened in Australia.

 

My most recent involvement has been with the International Association of Applied Psychology, one of the oldest associations of international psychologists in the world.  In 1986 I was elected onto the Association's Executive Committee, and in 1990 I was elected to the post of Secretary-General, the first Australian to hold this position. Subsequently I was elected to serve a second term in this office.

 

 

(h)        CONSULTING

 

One of my main interests in professional involvement of this kind is that it provides opportunities to keep Australian in touch with international trends and advances, and thus quicken the rate of diffusion of knowledge between Australia and the rest of the world.  In this connection I organised the "Managers of Tomorrow" conference in Melbourne which comprised a distinguished panel of overseas speakers who presented a critical review of the latest thinking and practice in management viewed from an international perspective.  This Conference was Monash University's only endorsed Bicentennial activity, and attracted a large group of senior executives from every State and Territory in Australia, as well as New Zealand.

 

In addition, I have always maintained close contact, principally with private sector organisations but also with government departments, advising and lecturing on a wide range of issues involving various aspects of organisational behaviour, human resource management and planned change.  My most important recent activity has been with a large and very successful Thai company for whom I organised a residential course on strategic management for its top echelon of business executives.

 

 

(i)         ACADEMIC PLANNING AND GOVERNANCE

 

For the past decade or more I have been heavily involved with University administration at several levels. The greatest of these involvements has been with the MBA program to which I was appointed in 1970 just after the inception of the degree in 1968.  Over the period of time since then I have served on every kind of committee associated with the MBA. I became Director of the program in the mid-nineties taking it to be the largest and top-ranked MBA in Australia. When at this junction the MBA Division was amalgamated with the Australian `Management College to form the Monash Mt Eliza Business School, I was seconded to the new Business School but returned to the University when the de-merger occurred at the end of 1999 and the MBA was brought back to the University.

 

At the time of the amalgamation I was a member of two Faculty Committees (the Academic Promotions Committee and the Occupational Health and Safety Committee), as well as one Inter-Faculty Committee (the Psychology Advisory Board in the Faculty of Science) and one University Committee (the Discipline Committee).  Previously, I have been a member of practically all Faculty Committees, as well as Warden of a University Hall of Residence, Chairman of the Committee of Wardens, and a member of the Halls of Residence Committee, then a Standing Committee of the University. 

 

 

 

(j)         HOBBIES

 

Sporting - Tennis, Skiing, Swimming/surfing

 

Entertainment – Theatre, opera, films

 

Travel – directly or indirectly through work I have visited the following countries:

Europe: Scotland, England, Ireland, France, Spain, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Serbia, Bosnia, Greece

Africa and the Middle East: Egypt, Israel

Asia: India, Thailand, Japan, mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia

North and Central America: Canada, Mexico, United States (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, Washington D.C., Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabamma, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, Indiana, Illinios, Ohio, Pennsylvania)

Pacific: Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Hawaii

 

Language Skills - Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, French, German, Hebrew, Vietnamese.

(basic level only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                            ATTACHMENTS

 

 

1          Comments from MBA Course Evaluations

 

2          Comments from Extra-mural Management Development Courses

 

3          Comments relating to the "Managers of Tomorrow" Conference

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment 1 -            COMMENTS FROM MBA COURSE EVALUATIONS

                                                                                                                             

 

 

.           Well presented, comprehensive course.  Extremely beneficial and relevant to my work and work organisation.  A great effort.

 

 

.           Fantastic subject.  Extremely relevant to the corporate environment.

 

 

.           A very enjoyable subject.  My congratulations.

 

 

.           The subject was intellectually stimulating as well as very enjoyable.  This I attribute to the excellent attitude of the lecturer.

 

 

.           Excellent subject.  The lecturing style and assistance given to the students is great.

 

 

.           This was far and away the most well coordinated and organised subject I have done.

 

 

.           Workload high, but very useful assignments.  `Experiential' exercises excellent.  Useful subject.

 

 

.           The workload is extremely high, however, this was one of the few times I felt I was doing a course for what's in the course (i.e., content) rather than focussing only on the final exam.

 

 

.           First class! The best course I have attended.

 

 

.           Enjoyable, well structured and interesting.  As an engineer, refreshingly different.  I can see why engineers for example sometimes get a reputation.  This course should be mandatory, if not at undergraduate level then as part of engineers' professional development.  I would like to send some of my staff to this subject.

 

 

 


Attachment 2 -            COMMENTS FROM EXTRA-MURAL MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT COURSES

                                                                                                                            

 

 

.           The (Staff) College is very fortunate to have a man like Dr Knowles to give continual sessions during the three weeks.  A most human and understanding person.

 

 

.           I have thoroughly enjoyed his presentations and feel that I have gained from them.

 

 

.           Could listen to this guy all day.

 

 

.           The last two sessions by Dr Knowles were again of great interest.  The College is most fortunate to have a man of such knowledge and popularity on the lecturing staff.

 

 

.           Dr Knowles is excellent and all his training sessions are excellent.

 

 

.           Another excellent session.

 

 

.           All Dr Knowles' segments have been interesting and thought provoking.

 

 

.           Dr Knowles - great.

 

 

.           This session was very helpful in enabling me to learning how to accept and implement the many changes that are taking place in our organization now and in the future.

 

 

.           Looking to the future we should now be prepared for anything.


 

ATTACHMENT 3 -   COMMENTS RELATING TO THE "MANAGERS OF TOMORROW" CONFERENCE

                                                                                                                             

.           First of all I want to say again how deeply impressed I was with the success of your venture in launching and organising the "Managers of Tomorrow" Conference.  I also want to thank you for the sumptuous hospitality at your home and elsewhere.  It was a memorable experience.

                                                                                                                              (Dr) F.A. Heller

                                                                                                                                          Director

                                                                                                              Tavistock Institute London

 

.           Let me say again how much I and the rest of our "team" appreciated all of your gracious hospitality during our visit to Melbourne, and especially all of your careful planning and thoughtful arrangements.  It was certainly a tour de force performance as an impresario and host on your part, and consequently I have a number of very pleasant memories of that week.

                                                                                                                     Professor L.W. Porter

                                                                                                                                               Dean

                                                                                                     Graduate School of Management

                                                                                                                    University of California

                                                                                                                                              Irvine

 

.           I would like to say that my visit to Melbourne was one of the best personal and professional experiences I have ever had.  I appreciate your kindness and all that you did to make the visit a success.

                                                                                                                    Professor Xu Liancang

                                                                                                                                          Director

                                                                                                                     Institute of Psychology

                                                                                                                                            Beijing

 

.           Upon returning, and having found some time to breathe again after the pile of work on my desk, I should like to thank you for all the support and hospitality poured on us during our visit in Sydney and especially in Melbourne.  I think it was a great experience for us and I admire your skill in putting the Conference symposium and manager workshop into reality - brilliantly done.

                                                                                                                       Professor B. Wilpert

                                                                                                                   Institute fur Psychologie

                                                                                                                     Technische Universitat

                                                                                                                                              Berlin

 

.           Before anything, I would like to thank you for everything you did for me in Sydney and Melbourne.  It was the first time I have visited Australia.  It was an exciting trip, and the people were also very kind.  The thing I enjoyed most was my visit to Melbourne.

 

                                                                                                                         Professor J. Misumi

                                                                                                                  Dean of Social Sciences

                                                                                                                               Nara University

                                                                                                                                              Japan


ATTACHMENT 3 (cont'd)

                                                                                                                            

 

 

.           A note to let you know how much my colleague and I enjoyed the Conference.  This was a wonderful initiative for our largest (as I have most recently become aware) Business School, and a fitting landmark in Australia's Bicentennial Year.  I have returned to IBM suitably enriched with new ideas, and perhaps a little more confident of Australia's own position with respect to international thinking in management.  Congratulations.

                                                                                                                                 A.D. Glasgow

                                                                                                                                               IBM

 

 

.           Thank you for the invitation to yesterday's Conference.  It was a brilliant success - especially your chairmanship.

                                                                                                                                 Mr F. Lawson

                                                                                                 Chairman of the Board of Directors

                                                                                                       Gibson Chemical Industries Ltd

 

 

.           This is just a short note to thank you for inviting me to your "Managers of Tomorrow Conference".  I am sure you must have been pleased with the large number of delegates.  My congratulations to you for organising such a successful event.

                                                                                                                              Nancy J. Hogan

                                                                                                                                         President

                                                                                                  Graduate Management Association

 

 

.           I would like to congratulate you upon the Conference "Managers of Tomorrow".  It was outstanding in all respects.  You assembled a group of international experts, the like of which has never been seen in Australia; they all performed well on the day; the Conference ran smoothly;  it attracted a large high level audience;  it boosted the image of the Graduate School of Management;  and it was a financial success.  Thank you and congratulations.

                                                                                                                    Professor A.H.M. Fels

                                                        Chairman - Australian Competition and Consumer Commission